Archive for the ‘Buyer Marketing’ category

Disrupt, Displace, Bleh. Semantics, right? WRONG

February 4th, 2014

I got interesting feedback from my post yesterday. I used very deliberate language to segment a disruptive technology versus a better displacement technology. It was interesting because the people who were in the midst of go-to-market planning immediately gravitated to the difference and the impact on their planning, but those who were involved, but not actively working on a market strategy didn’t see the theorectical difference. I thought I would explain why this was so critical and how it can change your adoption curve dramatically on both sides.

First, let’s clarify what disruption means versus displacement from a buyer’s point of view. Almost all technology companies seem to see this as the same from their perpective hence the go-to-market is the same. “We are going to disrupt the market and displace the leading competitor with our better technology.”

Yes, BUT…. that is from a vendor’s perspective. From a buyer’s perspective as it relates to their adoption, disrupt and displace has tremendous impact on whether they buy or not. Disrupt is perceived as disrupting our current operational processes. The more disruptive, the harder the adoption.

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Key to Your Buyer Adoption Problem

January 14th, 2014

The key to buyer adoption is to understand the context of the target buyers’ needs as “what tangible business problems the product will be able to assist them in solving?” For uneducated and unaware buyers, how do they know they need your product? If they only “know” their pain and are struggling to figure out the underlying problem causing that pain, how do they make the leap to your solution? Especially if it is an unique, disruptively differently innovation pre-market? Word-of-mouth? Sales relationships one-by-one? Carpet-bombing email campaigns? PR? Search?

The premise is that you will find them, they will become aware of your company, they will connect the dots to their issues, and get everyone involved in the decision on board to buy. Compound that with getting industry standard language, cohesion amongst emerging “lesser” competitors, critical mass of satisfied customers and you realize building a market for your disruptively innovation is long, costly, risky, and difficult.

The real challenge for your buyers is that buying your technology is not necessarily the same as solving their operational  problem. Continue reading “Key to Your Buyer Adoption Problem” »

Example of “Defining the Problem” for Buyers

October 28th, 2013

Our Target Companies have BtoB Complex, Innovative Technologies with the 4C’s of Adoption Complexity = Problems, Markets, Buyer Organizations, and Solutions

What Problem Do We Solve for Them?
Fix “problem adoption” which is underpinning their market adoption. Problem is not pain. Problem is the underlying cause, pain is the resulting symptoms. Buyers buy to fix a problem, not buy a really cool technology. Well, in more sophisticated buying organizations with adult supervision over their investment in technology or solutions. Very few organizations have a blank check on their spending, but most have to justify to management why they need the latest and greatest in terms of business impact, risk, prioritization, return, adoption, etc.

How Do We Fix the Problem?
Continue reading “Example of “Defining the Problem” for Buyers” »

CEO as Chief Buyer Officer

April 18th, 2013

We are all seeing a shift from vendor-driven to peer-influence is marginalizing vendors. Buyers demand to be empowered with education on the problem definition before they engage for education on the solution differences.

We believe that the underlying problem that is driving this shift in your markets FROM a buyer’s perspective is that your company is not helping them understand what problem(s) that you solve for them. We believe that this is accelerating because the availability of information is increasing in markets. The buyers don’t need or can’t find the vendors who don’t help them with decision support. But, why is this a CEO level problem?

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Am I Truly a Problem Solver? Or am I Just Creating Pain? 5 Ways to Tell for Both Sales and Marketing

April 11th, 2013

Over the last few weeks, I have had numerous conversations with sales and marketing executives about solving problems. About ½ tell me that diagnosing problems is what they have always done. “Nothing new here, move along!”

My standard response is “maybe”. Good problem consultants are able to help people diagnose what underlying problem is the cause of symptomatic pain. Good enterprise consultative sales people know how to help organizations get to consensus as to what problem is really causing the various ills across the organization. True.

BUT, are you truly diagnosing their ills or are you guiding them to your solution? What is the difference? A good doctor is supposed to truly listen to the symptoms and diagnose the patient in front of them. They are not supposed to represent a drug company and just prescribe the “wonder” drug for everything.

  • Ever seen an IT project that completed just as the vendor promised, addressing some of the pains, but not solve the customer’s problems and creating a whole host of other pains?
  • Ever see a customer demo, go away for 6 months, and then come back and ask for a demo again? Same solution, but obviously they were still trying to figure out their underlying problem and whether the solution would address their ills.
  • Ever see a sale where they had multiple problems, only one of which you could solve?
  • Ever jointly sell with a strategic partner to create a larger solution?
  • Ever see similar size companies in the same industry have completely different needs, different buying process, and even different decision maker?

Continue reading “Am I Truly a Problem Solver? Or am I Just Creating Pain? 5 Ways to Tell for Both Sales and Marketing” »