Archive for the ‘Marketing Strategy’ category

Confused on What Adoption Really Means?

August 6th, 2014

We created a visual primer on the major types of adoption. Enjoy!

Reconciling Freemium Model and Adoption for B2B Technology Companies

July 24th, 2014

Interesting trend that we have seen lately – B2B SaaS software firms who are dealing with an adoption problem despite their freemium offerings. It seems that they have a huge drop-off from the sign-ups on the freemium version to their paid version. Not surprising that there is a drop-off, but many feel like the drop-off is bigger than expected given the value that they provide.

We have seen this before with a client that we worked with so I feel confident that I can guess at some of the root issues:

  • Sales Team – They are selling a somewhat complicated solution without a direct sales force substituting a free experience for sales management. For many less complex, consumerized applications this is an appropriate model as the cost of sales does not support the cost of the application.
  • Adoption – For the more complex applications, the challenge for the larger organizations is getting people to buy into the application – intellectually, emotionally, and operationally. Freemium does not mean it does not have a cost to the buyers. Continue reading “Reconciling Freemium Model and Adoption for B2B Technology Companies” »

10 Common Market Adoption Issues That I See in BtoB Technology Companies

July 16th, 2014
  1. Inability to drive effective/qualified sales opportunities through marketing
  2. Difficulty explaining to target companies that our technology is best @ solving particular business problem that they are experienced. We cannot differentiate between visible “pain” and underlying “problem” that you actually solve for the buyer.
  3. Heavy emphasis on generic business value and deep technical differentiation in messaging.
  4. Difficulty within lead generation activities to reach “senior executive” decision makers in target organizations – forcing sales to sell up through organization. Continue reading “10 Common Market Adoption Issues That I See in BtoB Technology Companies” »

Part 1 – Why a Problem Elevator May Be Your Problem

February 8th, 2014

If you told me a few weeks ago that my world would hinge on the word “problem” and a lot of the challenges I was having in driving understanding of our business would be based upon the lack of clarity as to what a problem really is, I would have been shocked.

I routinely ask my friends and contacts, “what problem do you solve and for whom”. I usually get a surprised look, a pause, and then something that resembles a value statement. But, it wasn’t till this week that I realized that the word “problem” had a different context. Talk about a loaded word.

When I have been using the word “problem”, I have been asking the question from an uneducated buyer’s perspective. “If I had never heard of your industry, let alone your company, what problem would I come to you for?” But, that has been interpreted as “How we do what we do that helps you.”

Continue reading “Part 1 – Why a Problem Elevator May Be Your Problem” »

Part 2 – What is the difference between “In-market buyers” and for “buyers with a problem that is yet to become a market”

February 8th, 2014

In-market – if your industry is half-way through its lifecycle, there may be a lot of buyers who don’t realize there is a category out there for their problem. Or, they don’t see the painful issues they are dealing with in their business as related to the industry. Or, they think they need to build their own homegrown solution to the problem. In short, they may have the problem, but the short-hand is not helping them connect to the industry/category, let alone to your approach to solving the problem. You need to be able to build a problem elevator that connects what they are experiencing to the solution you provide. Take to the basics, build bottom-up from the problem and their experience rather than category down through your feature differences.

Continue reading “Part 2 – What is the difference between “In-market buyers” and for “buyers with a problem that is yet to become a market”” »