Posts Tagged ‘adoption’

Reconciling Freemium Model and Adoption for B2B Technology Companies

July 24th, 2014

Interesting trend that we have seen lately – B2B SaaS software firms who are dealing with an adoption problem despite their freemium offerings. It seems that they have a huge drop-off from the sign-ups on the freemium version to their paid version. Not surprising that there is a drop-off, but many feel like the drop-off is bigger than expected given the value that they provide.

We have seen this before with a client that we worked with so I feel confident that I can guess at some of the root issues:

  • Sales Team – They are selling a somewhat complicated solution without a direct sales force substituting a free experience for sales management. For many less complex, consumerized applications this is an appropriate model as the cost of sales does not support the cost of the application.
  • Adoption – For the more complex applications, the challenge for the larger organizations is getting people to buy into the application – intellectually, emotionally, and operationally. Freemium does not mean it does not have a cost to the buyers. Continue reading “Reconciling Freemium Model and Adoption for B2B Technology Companies” »

Defining a Core Business Problem for Technology Companies

June 24th, 2014

It has been a while since we wrote a post, so I thought I would outline why I think that you, as a technology vendor, probably have a unique technology, but have an adoption problem. What you think is a technology adoption problem is really a buyer adoption problem.

As a buyer, I bet if I read your website or marketing materials, I would not be clear on what strategic business problem that you solve or what changes in behavior are required of the buyers to adopt your approach. But I can hear you say:”Wait. You don’t know what I do. How can you say I have a problem without looking at my stuff?”

I know because this is the core existential problem for almost every technology company and because adoption is so difficult to overcome quickly. Technology by definition is change. Newer is better, different. If it ain’t new, it ain’t technology. Even “old” technology is referring to something that was new at the time and now is obsolete. So, the business of technology is the business of change. Continue reading “Defining a Core Business Problem for Technology Companies” »

Disrupt, Displace, Bleh. Semantics, right? WRONG

February 4th, 2014

I got interesting feedback from my post yesterday. I used very deliberate language to segment a disruptive technology versus a better displacement technology. It was interesting because the people who were in the midst of go-to-market planning immediately gravitated to the difference and the impact on their planning, but those who were involved, but not actively working on a market strategy didn’t see the theorectical difference. I thought I would explain why this was so critical and how it can change your adoption curve dramatically on both sides.

First, let’s clarify what disruption means versus displacement from a buyer’s point of view. Almost all technology companies seem to see this as the same from their perpective hence the go-to-market is the same. “We are going to disrupt the market and displace the leading competitor with our better technology.”

Yes, BUT…. that is from a vendor’s perspective. From a buyer’s perspective as it relates to their adoption, disrupt and displace has tremendous impact on whether they buy or not. Disrupt is perceived as disrupting our current operational processes. The more disruptive, the harder the adoption.

Continue reading “Disrupt, Displace, Bleh. Semantics, right? WRONG” »

Sometimes We All Need A Reminder About Simply Addressing the Buyer’s Problem

January 7th, 2014

Look, buyer adoption and problem solving as core approach versus product education and market evangelism is not easy. Sometimes we even need to be reminded of why this is so critical and so powerful. I got a call last week from a friend who is working with a technology company looking at doing a new product launch. They wanted to leverage social marketing to boot-strap their launch. We spend so much time on the complexity of our client’s disruptive technologies that I forget that sometimes it is about simply being a better way to build a market.

We, Social Gastronomy, are better at building markets today because we have built upon our experience doing it the traditional way for a lot of years. I was researching marketing over the web for an advertising firm in 1994. The internet class gave out disks with Netscape release .9 beta. Not sure which is scarier – how long ago in regards to Netscape or the fact we used to call it advertising. We funded the start of Social Gastronomy with a couple of engagements with myself as acting part-time CMO for several start-ups and Joanne doing the social marketing execution. I have been bootstrapping early stage technology companies marketing almost my whole career. I started with fax marketing in 1993. When digital marketing was just fax; pre-internet, pre-email. The communications technologies may evolve, the buyers have gotten much smarter, the information may have gotten more overwhelming, but at the end of the day; we are in the people business. We are here to help understand, connect with, and assist our buyers in solving a problem. Whatever problem THEY think they have. Sometimes, you just have to step outside of your box and remember it is about their problems and their context. So here is a part of my response to how we can help bootstrap a market launch…..

Continue reading “Sometimes We All Need A Reminder About Simply Addressing the Buyer’s Problem” »

Call to Market Leadership

May 7th, 2013

We are looking for particular companies that are frustrated with the status quo in their market and who can partner with us to drive adoption and create a game change disruption in their market. BtoB complex technology companies are feeling the pain of the shift in buyer behavior in markets. Everyone is struggling to find an edge to get in front of more buyers, but we believe that they are not addressing the fundamental, underlying problem that will allow them to break through the adoption wall.  Everyone we speak with is seeing the 80:20 effect in their market. 80% of the buyers aren’t educated on the solution and they are only getting less than 20% of the potential buyers that they know are out there to adopt. This isn’t just about marketing or sales. This about  fundamentally redesigning the way we approach and engage with buyers. So, we are reaching out to see if you know such a
company:

  • Hit the 20% adoption wall and looking for an edge to break out
  • Clear differentiation against competitors with market opportunity
  • Good executive business leadership open to innovation
  • Complex technology solution with heavy education, customization, and strategic executive decision maker
  • Complex buying environment with variable decision makers, influencers, and ecosystems

Continue reading “Call to Market Leadership” »