Posts Tagged ‘buying process’

Disrupt, Displace, Bleh. Semantics, right? WRONG

February 4th, 2014

I got interesting feedback from my post yesterday. I used very deliberate language to segment a disruptive technology versus a better displacement technology. It was interesting because the people who were in the midst of go-to-market planning immediately gravitated to the difference and the impact on their planning, but those who were involved, but not actively working on a market strategy didn’t see the theorectical difference. I thought I would explain why this was so critical and how it can change your adoption curve dramatically on both sides.

First, let’s clarify what disruption means versus displacement from a buyer’s point of view. Almost all technology companies seem to see this as the same from their perpective hence the go-to-market is the same. “We are going to disrupt the market and displace the leading competitor with our better technology.”

Yes, BUT…. that is from a vendor’s perspective. From a buyer’s perspective as it relates to their adoption, disrupt and displace has tremendous impact on whether they buy or not. Disrupt is perceived as disrupting our current operational processes. The more disruptive, the harder the adoption.

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Understanding Buyer’s Adoption

June 18th, 2013

Last few weeks, we have had some pretty intensive conversations as to why ADOPTION?

  • Like, I get it, but why do you call it adoption?
  • I know about technology adoption, but buyer adoption?
  • I do X, we can’t do it, but I think my buyers need to understand this because this fixes some problems upstream of me.
  • Why isn’t everyone doing this?
  • Sales does this one-to-one, why can’t our marketing team do this?

So, I am not going to answer all of these directly, we put a deck together http://www.slideshare.net/mrosenhaft/social-gastronomy-defining-the-adoption-problem-130611 which introduces why you might have an adoption problem. I suggest that you read it and then read the rest of this post as it will make a lot more sense. But, here is my take on understanding buyer’s adoption: Continue reading “Understanding Buyer’s Adoption” »

Is the 80:20 Rule A Ceiling for Your Adoption?

May 2nd, 2013

If you define buyer market adoption as the intersection of your technology solutions adoption in the market with the buyer’s need to fix a painful problem, then your adoption rate for your technology solution is the conversion number in your available universe who actually recognize the pain to the number of buyers that you actually helped solve the underlying cause of that pain with your technology solution.

-Or-

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Am I Truly a Problem Solver? Or am I Just Creating Pain? 5 Ways to Tell for Both Sales and Marketing

April 11th, 2013

Over the last few weeks, I have had numerous conversations with sales and marketing executives about solving problems. About ½ tell me that diagnosing problems is what they have always done. “Nothing new here, move along!”

My standard response is “maybe”. Good problem consultants are able to help people diagnose what underlying problem is the cause of symptomatic pain. Good enterprise consultative sales people know how to help organizations get to consensus as to what problem is really causing the various ills across the organization. True.

BUT, are you truly diagnosing their ills or are you guiding them to your solution? What is the difference? A good doctor is supposed to truly listen to the symptoms and diagnose the patient in front of them. They are not supposed to represent a drug company and just prescribe the “wonder” drug for everything.

  • Ever seen an IT project that completed just as the vendor promised, addressing some of the pains, but not solve the customer’s problems and creating a whole host of other pains?
  • Ever see a customer demo, go away for 6 months, and then come back and ask for a demo again? Same solution, but obviously they were still trying to figure out their underlying problem and whether the solution would address their ills.
  • Ever see a sale where they had multiple problems, only one of which you could solve?
  • Ever jointly sell with a strategic partner to create a larger solution?
  • Ever see similar size companies in the same industry have completely different needs, different buying process, and even different decision maker?

Continue reading “Am I Truly a Problem Solver? Or am I Just Creating Pain? 5 Ways to Tell for Both Sales and Marketing” »

Disconnected Buyers and Vendors

June 21st, 2012

We are finally getting to the heart of the matter in terms of why vendors are seeing increasingly difficulty in targeting buyers in the market. Almost embarrassing how simple a concept, but given how long it took for us to identify is probably how indicative of how difficult it is to actually execute, let alone do it systemically and predictably.

In short, buyers are entering a marketplace trying to solve a problem. Vendors are in the market looking to sell their solution. The language differences are on par with “Men Are From Mars and Women Are From Venus.” Or so my wife tells me. (Joking - I really read the book)

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