Posts Tagged ‘Customer Lifecycles’

A Tale of 2 Marketing Programs: Social Media Versus Search Engines

November 24th, 2009

Social media is going to take budget dollars away from search engine marketing. Already is in many major brands. Simple economics are driving this transition.

If a major ecommerce player is spending 50% of their budget on search engine marketing, website optimization, and link optimization programs, but is losing the war to bloggers in organic search. Why would the ecommerce player continue to spend massive amounts of money on advertising when they can focus on blogger outreach (ethical, not paid) for far less money. Better yet, fix their customer experience and get customers to evangelize on their behalf. this slide says it all….

Click Picture to Expand

Additionally, as we analyze the various social media monitoring and metrics tools, the challenge is pretty evident. Search engines work off of structured data. I can run an advanced search and build filters for my search results. The challenge with social search is that the taxonomy isn’t defined. How you talk about a problem can be completely different than I talk about it. Potential buyers may not even recognize that the problem they are discussing on social media is even in the market. How do you build an automated tracking of taxonomy around unstructured data?

Effective lead generation program within social marketing require human knowledge of your solutions and also the ability to follow discussion threads to identify contextual relavence. Over time, you should be able to fine tune the algorithms for your social monitoring programs to become 80% accurate, but the most successful programs are leveraging human knowledge to make social marketing engagement programs to become discoverable, impactful, and actionable.

Otherwise, you get the the large number of costly “unqualified” leads that flood into websites similar to the search engine marketing programs. These programs either make it up in volume or work the “long tail” of key words to reach better qualified buyers. Social marketing can get you to the “long tail” faster as most buyers start with questions in the long tail when they do not know what they are looking for and leverage the expertise of others to become more specific as they learn what they don’t know.

Social Media Policy and Your 15 minutes of Fame

November 23rd, 2009

Andy Warhol said that in the future everyone would be famous for 15 minutes.  For one Atlanta area teacher, that fame – or rather, infamy – comes in the form of pictures posted on her Facebook page.  Over the summer this particular teacher took a trip to Europe where she was included in snapshots with friends at dinner and over drinks.  Seems simple enough, except that she posted the pictures on her Facebook page, where a parent got wind of the posting and complained.

What is a teacher to do?  What is any employee to do?

Typically teachers are held to pretty high standards of behavior, detailed in county level morals clauses and statewide professional standards.  So why all the fuss and confusion?  In this case, there seems to be a lack of clear and thoughtful social media policies at the county level.  In fact, the Atlanta area system where this incident occurred isn’t schedule to consider developing or implementing social media guidelines until December.

Unfortunately, this is not surprising.  A recent MarketingSherpa survey revealed that only 33% of large businesses and organizations have implemented a Social Media Policy.  The other 67% either don’t recognize the need, or are still in the development process.

Why are so many companies dragging their feet?  There are a couple of reasons:

Fad – Too many corporations still think that social media interactions are a fad.  Why would any no nonsense, well regarded brand embrace a medium built on chit chat and status updates?  These entities think of social media as time wasters and discourage usage.  The reality is that the medium is here to stay.  Whether it’s called Facebook tomorrow, people will still be interacting in the social media space.  Smart companies will embrace this and develop guidelines for employee usage.  Really smart companies will incorporate social media activities into their own communications structure, championing information exchange among employees and potential customers and harnessing the power of that influence.

Fear –  Leadership at many larger companies and organizations came of age at a time when  brand communications where one way – outward facing.  Large brands told customers what they wanted them to know, orchestrated how and when those messages would be presented, and called it a day.  Now that communications model is crashing to the ground and many C-suite executives don’t know what to do.   Comments and messages on social media platforms are submitted for public consumption.  And when those mentions are negative or even false, many organizations don’t know what to do to handle them.  Creation of social media policy builds a framework and a context within which companies can begin to handle these sentiments.  Courageous companies will listen to the chatter and will thoughtfully consider how and when to react, turning negative comments into customer service opportunities

Frustration – Some large companies have gotten in front of the wave and are already “active” in the social media space.  They may have a Facebook page and a Twitter account, but they don’t do anything with it.  Just this week, AdAge reported that 76% of Branded Twitter accounts lie dormant.  Lack of policies, strategy and intention have hamstring many early adopters and their attempts at successful utilization of social media within their organizations and in the online community.  But a structured approach to social media, beginning with social media guidelines for internal communications and external outreach, will reduce corporate frustration.  Companies that seek to develop methods of internal communication empowered by social media can groom and grow their own corporate cheerleaders and industry evangelists, and shape organizational perception.

It has been said many times that perception in reality.  No matter what our intent, it is the perception of its receipt that is remembered.  Perhaps the teacher at the center of this latest Facebook incident did not intend for others to see or respond to her posted pictures in the way that they did.  But the reality is that, regardless of her motivations, someone complained.  She might have been helped by clear and thoughtful social media policies from her employer.  Definitely, the employer would have firmer footing to engage the teacher if there had been.

It seems here Facebook pictures are feeling more like a mug shot than anything else.