Posts Tagged ‘Lead Generation’

Disruption and Adoption Are Confusing the Real Issue

February 3rd, 2014

It starts with the dreaded question in the pitch meeting. Usually slide #2 of your supposed 5 slide deck. “I think I get what you do, how are you going to build a market?”

You, at that point, will discuss the extrapolated X number of companies that fit the target, talk about your percentage that of the available that you would like to have within Y years, and then talk about all of the mechanics that you plan on driving to get  that percentage at Z cost per customer in acquisition costs. Numbers are actually irrelevant since the person who asked the question won’t really believe your answer; they just want to see if you understand the variables to the formula.

What is really hidden in the question is the assumption about how expensive it is to build and develop a market. They are looking for your Go-to-market strategy, but really they are looking for your built-in short-cuts. They are looking for ways that you can short-circuit the standard investment model for building a market.

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Buyer Market Adoption Problem Resolution

May 7th, 2013

The fundamental business problem that we see for complex BtoB technology companies is that they lack an understanding of the nuances and differences of how diverse and complex buyers in their markets adopt new technologies to solve problems sufficiently to enable our company to become a trusted problem diagnosis advisor and recognized solution partner in the market sufficient to differentiate us prior to a relationship and significantly transform adoption rates for your technology solution.

Peer Influenced versus Vendor Driven Shift – We see that the shift in BtoB corporate buyer behavior is significantly impacting the way buyers clarify the causation of their acute business pains, determine prioritization and make strategic business decisions, research problem solving options, define requirements, engage with vendors, and define expectations for customer experience. In short, social media has gone from a tangential impact on the buying process to becoming the underpinning of peer influence as the central foundation for decision making. This means that buyer adoption process is more influential than the traditional vendor driven solution evangelism and is radically shifting the definitions of markets. Introducing new definitions of market engagement: Continue reading “Buyer Market Adoption Problem Resolution” »

Is the 80:20 Rule A Ceiling for Your Adoption?

May 2nd, 2013

If you define buyer market adoption as the intersection of your technology solutions adoption in the market with the buyer’s need to fix a painful problem, then your adoption rate for your technology solution is the conversion number in your available universe who actually recognize the pain to the number of buyers that you actually helped solve the underlying cause of that pain with your technology solution.

-Or-

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Am I Truly a Problem Solver? Or am I Just Creating Pain? 5 Ways to Tell for Both Sales and Marketing

April 11th, 2013

Over the last few weeks, I have had numerous conversations with sales and marketing executives about solving problems. About ½ tell me that diagnosing problems is what they have always done. “Nothing new here, move along!”

My standard response is “maybe”. Good problem consultants are able to help people diagnose what underlying problem is the cause of symptomatic pain. Good enterprise consultative sales people know how to help organizations get to consensus as to what problem is really causing the various ills across the organization. True.

BUT, are you truly diagnosing their ills or are you guiding them to your solution? What is the difference? A good doctor is supposed to truly listen to the symptoms and diagnose the patient in front of them. They are not supposed to represent a drug company and just prescribe the “wonder” drug for everything.

  • Ever seen an IT project that completed just as the vendor promised, addressing some of the pains, but not solve the customer’s problems and creating a whole host of other pains?
  • Ever see a customer demo, go away for 6 months, and then come back and ask for a demo again? Same solution, but obviously they were still trying to figure out their underlying problem and whether the solution would address their ills.
  • Ever see a sale where they had multiple problems, only one of which you could solve?
  • Ever jointly sell with a strategic partner to create a larger solution?
  • Ever see similar size companies in the same industry have completely different needs, different buying process, and even different decision maker?

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The Problem We Solve Defines Us

December 6th, 2012

Sometimes, what you sell isn’t what they want or need to buy.

We knew we had an adoption problem over the spring and summer. We were on our 2nd iteration of business model which was about six months old. We were getting good results from the social marketing services, but were as frustrated as some of our customers as to expectations of outcomes. It was just taking too long to get the traction and we had lost some customers to their expectations of immediacy that we weren’t capable of delivering. We were too dependent upon them to “help us help them” to understand the problem they solved for their clients. Never a good business model to be dependent upon clients for their own strategy. Never a good business model to blame the client for the lack of success either.

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