Posts Tagged ‘online community’

Social Media is Raising the Bar on Enterprise Relationships

January 4th, 2011

I admit it. I have used the phrase “Relationship with the Brand” at one point in my career. I am now officially classified as a recovering “brand” guy.

 But, then again I have also used Customer Relationship Management to describe a customer relationship with the same seriousness. I have also come to the revelation that CRM really stands for customer record management.  I am also now officially classified as a recovering “CRM” guy too.

 If I keep this up, I won’t have many corporate friends left.

 In all seriousness, the state of the technology is improving and we are seeing the impact of social media on the corporate view of “customer relationships”. If you ask almost any senior executive about the importance of customer relationships, or any enterprise relationships, you will get an absolute affirmative. All of them would agree that relationships make the difference in business, but they would be challenged to express how relationships have a direct tangible benefit.

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Social Market Research Will Save Marketing

October 15th, 2010

Even as I write the title, I cringe. As I am a late convert to the value of formalized market research. I still have flashbacks of my market research class in grad school. All I remember is statistics, database, demographics, statistics, blah, blah, blah… all I retained is that mean and medium are somehow different and important. I got lucky in that my immediate neighbor in the first class was an actuary so when they formed teams, he became my best friend.

As I progressed in Sales and Marketing management, I realized the value of asking customers what they really wanted and how they felt. I also realized there are limitations in that process. Not that customers lie, but I can’t always tell you why I do something instinctively. I just do. In asking me to explain, you may or may not get to the heart of “why.” Also, depending on “when” you ask me my opinion will vary greatly.

That is why good market research leverages statistical sampling to make sure the sample size is large enough to represent a target population. We use sampling techniques because the population is too large to cost effectively poll or they are too difficult to get all of the responses.

Shocker Statement: Traditional Market Research has a Fundamental Problem

If you know anything about political polling, they have lots of discussions about the difference between likely voters and registered voters, etc. They also beat each other up about polling techniques; whether it was phone based, did they include cell phones, the average age of the respondent, etc. What they really are trying to do is correct for the impact that the process of polling has on the outcomes. Minor differences can radically shift the results of the poll.

Corporate market research has the same challenges. Not that they don’t account for much of it, the state of the art is pretty sophisticated and gotten much more so with algorithms, etc. What the challenge for corporate marketers is always who constitutes “likely buyers” versus potential buyers. If I poll based on demographics, I can’t really tell who is likely to be a potential buyer. On websites, they spend a lot of money on predictive algorithms and website “cookie crumb trails” to try and predict potential buying behaviors.

But the challenge in primary market research is that it is an approximation of the market. A sampling set if you will. The challenge that I contend is that we sample the wrong sets in market research.

Ok, before I get lynched by a bunch of analytics, let me explain. We have been doing social market research over the last year. We probably surveyed the landscapes of 60+ markets — probably 100+ sub-markets.  Everyone of them is showing a difference in the way buyers are approaching markets versus sellers. Not talking subtleties, but in most cases, the majority missed the mark —buyers are talking over social media at a 10:1 clip versus vendors. AND they are using completely different language. Vendors are focused on the “solution stack” -– features, functionality, benefits. Buyers are focused on pain, experience, exploration, decision support, value, etc.

What it is telling us in aggregate is that vendors are only focusing on a subset of the market; those who understand the industry jargon. The vast majority of buying markets are not being serviced with the right information. I would guess somewhere about 80% of buyers or potential buyers don’t know what they don’t know and therefore cannot perform structured searches or clarify their buying interest to market researchers.

I also think this is why major brands are shifting much of their new product innovation to social media and online communities. P&G has dictated something like 50% of their new product innovation will come from its customer community. Staggering, but also a recognition that the traditional market research approach cannot get to those who don’t self identify as being part of the market.

10 Really Cool Insights from Social Market Research

  1. Disconnect between buyers and sellers in markets
  2. Difference in buyer types leads to different online buying processes
  3. Most buying processes now intersects online and goes non-linear via social media at some point; research, validation, comparison, transaction, etc.
  4. Sellers are still trying to push a linear buying process that they think they can actually influence
  5. Estimated 80% of potential buyers don’t know that they are in the market and are engaging outside of the vendor communities traditional venues.
  6. We can see language differences in different types of buyers and vendors
  7. We are using this analysis to segment and target specific types of potential buyers who would not normally consider themselves as active in the market.
  8. Good social market research allows organizations to identify gaps in their approach to the market, focus on the psychographic buyer behavior, and eliminate the high-cost/low return marketing expenditures that they have had to cling to because they produced critical volumes of sales albeit at higher cost of acquisition.
  9. Customer experiences for good or bad are now bleeding into the non-linear buying processes. Vendors who don’t get control of their poor experiences will experience a different kind of bleeding; profits.
  10. We haven’t even touched the tip of the iceberg as the semantic analytics and market research techniques get updated.

Today Social Market Research is largely a blend of qualitative sampling and quantitative support. Just because you can measure it doesn’t mean you can derive meaningful business impact from it. The qualitative analysis allows us to overcome the challenges with the state of the social media tools. We can sometimes use up to 16 different tools for just one function. It isn’t about clicking a button and “poof” you have your answer to grow market share overnight. Also, having your own community allows you dimensionality of insight versus just polling public social network sites. Add in structured customer data and you have the backbone for some amazing buying behavior analysis. Over the next couple of years, the semi-automated process will mature and give way to more automated, trending, and analytical driven systems that integrated with the current business intelligence systems.

For us today, Social Market Research is the first step in building a social business plan. Not just for marketing, but all of the customer facing touch points and all of the customer support functions. In short, pretty much all of the business. You don’t know what you don’t know.

The challenge is can you figure it out before your competitors do.

Enterprise Social Architecture: Need My House Jack?

January 21st, 2010

We spend a lot of time with larger enterprises discussing how to integrate these newer technologies; web 2.0, community, social media, collaboration, etc. into their existing environments.

There are similarities to owning an older home. Learning a lot lately about how older homes were constructed. Our house was built in the 1950′s and they used a center beam and wing construction model. Think of a ship, center beam and wings fanning out from there. Over time, the center beam begins to sag a little, not very flexible so you put in house jacks, bracket the beam, and put in supports, etc. In older homes, you always find that the previous owners have added their improvements; rewired electricity, added a bathroom, added an addition built on a different foundation, etc.

If you think about many of the larger enterprises, they have the same challenges. Centerbeam for support which isn’t very flexible and sags. The center beam is the ERP system and the wings are the other systems that hang off of it; payroll, onboarding, content mgmt, crm, business Intelligence, supply chain, logistics, intranets, portals, various biz apps, email, etc.ERP. Added a lot additions; business intelligence, CRM, content, web apps, intranets, supply chain, etc.

 We spend a lot of time with enterprise organizations and their domain experts talking about how to socially enable the core business systems and processes custom lifecycle management. We hear all the time from CIO’s that they don’t want to make any major system changes as they are still paying for it; with all of the additions and changes, they still have a hefty residual mtg payment or amortization and  would like to get more life out of the systems without having a payment.

 The good news is that the home remodeling busness has advanced with new technologies, techniques, and implementation processes to retrofit an older home with the latest green and or backbone and foundation strengthening and life extending techniques for older homes.

Same thing for larger enterprises looking retrofitting their social backbone for their organization to gain effiencies, competitive advantage, or keep up wth their customer requirements. They can implement a social architecture without requiring them to rip out existing systems or do major infrastructure changes.

 We have begun to develop social program and system implementations with the variuos partner organizations to take advantage of enterprise class social for lead generation, customer lifecycle mgmt, business intelligence, new product development, project collaboration, and emploee engagement as just a sampling of initiatives that we are seeing.

Retrofitting a home is harder than new construction in a lot of ways, but for many homeowners who want to keep the charm of their home intact or who cannot afford to major home repair, it is an attractive option.

Retrofitting older information infrastructures to take advantages of social and collaboration can provide similar life extending and or cost reducing alternatives to upgrading without disruption.

Every Conversation is Social

January 19th, 2010

What does that mean?

You ever wake up and remember a snippet of a dream? We work through problems in our sleep. If you don’t capture it, it is gone. Or at least for me. So, I wake up with this “Build it and they will come” message in my head…. “Every Conversation is Social”.

 It is like my subconscious is trying to punch through to my conscious to get the message through. I am reminded of the 1960’s scifi movie where they shrunk the space ship and floated through someone’s body. If they didn’t get the host to do something, they would be trapped. What message what trying to get through?

 Every Conversation is Social – Possible Meanings

  • Consulting – every conversation that I have had lately has been around how to socially enable the enterprise; customer lifecycles, lead generation, enterprise search and collaboration. I have been feeling guilty about not blogging more, but we have been so busy since the new year with speaking opportunities and client meetings… Maybe…
  • Social Market Audits – we have been doing a lot of social market audits; looking at the market for companies to assess how ready their market is for social marketing and how to leverage social media for lead generation, branding, and thought leadership. Maybe a reflection of our discussions about how to identify networks, influencers, and conversations in social media.
  • Partners – we had a conversation internally about how to better empower our business partners to have the social enablement conversation in their respective domains; business intelligence, CRM, call center, employee engagement.
  • Kids – could be just simply a random phrase. I have been joking with my 4 year old that he “gets older every day”. Maybe it is just a tru-ism…
  • Really Important Epiphany – maybe it is a garbled thought that I can’t remember anything other than the last thought of a great idea – Like the Lassie commercial on TV lately – “Lassie, go… blah,blah, blah… Farmer Brown… blah, blah, blah… help… blah, blah… COOKIE…”  Maybe it is like…“Every…. Blah, blah… Conversation… blah, blah, blah… social.
  • Could be a title – possibly for a great book or seminar on “Social Marketing”.
  • Really Bad Epitaph? – I really hope this isn’t the highlight of my life, though.
  • … Or just maybe I have social on the brain and it is a random thought

Enterprise Social Media and Online Communities Have a Long Way to Go

October 14th, 2009

I get a lot of industry articles and reports emailed to me… a lot… I think it is a reflection of the interest that is being generated around the discussions that we have on how to apply social media to business. Some of this has been documented in this blog, but much has happened so fast and furious over the last few weeks that we haven’t been able to catch up. A couple of reports that are worthy of your review as stand-alone pieces of research, but taken together validate the conversations that we are having…

1. Deloitte’s Tribalization of Business Study on Online Communities – Really good metrics on community usage. Worth noting that many of their communities are smaller which also reflects their sampling business size. Additionally, very skewed to business-to-business which also is reflective of the state of the market. An analysis of the report finds that” 60% of communities are less than 1 year old & greater than 2/3′s of the communities have less than 1,000 members.”

2. 8 ways the American information worker remains a Luddite in ComputerWorld – October 10, Eric Lai – Quotes a Forrester Research Study around corporate technology usage. “Less than 20% of information workers said they visit social networking sites for work”

Take that into context around the amount of education that we have been doing with all size organizations on how to build effective social marketing programs, you can see that the market is just really beginning. We have been doing Social Marketing Assessments for companies to give a snapshot of how they are doing comparative to the market in terms of their social media presence. Really easy to play “gotcha” with most companies as they haven’t developed formalized blogger outreach and social media participation programs. As more companies realize that this will be a critical requirement for either maintaining market share and/or finding opportunities to reach potential buyers in a low cost way, you will see more companies do outreach on social media.

From there, the next logical step will be to build their own communities into their website to continue the conversation and begin the sales process within the confines of their websites. This gives more analytics, better influence over the conversation, and the ability to drive search engine optimization. Dynamic social media content is optimized better than static content pages.

Good news/bad news is that we have a long way to go & it may be a shorter process than many people expect….

Matthew Rosenhaft

Principal

Social Gastronomy

mrosenhaft@socialgastronomy.com