Crossing the Real Chasm for Buyers

May 21st, 2013 by Matthew Rosenhaft No comments »

A couple of leading questions that I think will frame the discussion. What is the difference between:

1. Pain versus Problem?

2. Solutioning versus Decisioning?

3. Solution Adoption versus Buyer Adoption?

4. Solution Delivery versus Problem Solving?

5. Peer-Influenced versus Vendor-Driven Decision Support?

If you can’t diagnose the REAL underlying problem that is the causation of the symptomatic pain that buyers are experiencing – think strategic, cross-functional business problem that the SVP has to really make a serious, involved decision to solve versus the departmental complaints that give you an indication something is broken – then it is really hard to facilitate the complex decisions they need to make to solve the problem.

If you are not solving the problem, you are really looking for pain to match to your solution’s value proposition. May solve the real underlying problem, or not. Solutioning is not problem solving. Buyers are looking at adoption as “what do I need to solve a painful problem?” while vendors look at adoption as “What do I need to do to get a buyer to buy my technology solution?” The disconnect creates a huge risk for the buyer which grows exponentially with the number of depts/people involved with decision, complexity of the technology, complexity of the implementation, cost of the solution, and the length of the project. Add in the need to get people trained and using the system fully to see the value and you wonder why buyers are hesitant to move forward, fear the unknown, and feel like most projects fail to meet their expectations? Continue reading “Crossing the Real Chasm for Buyers” »

Your Business Operates As Designed

May 9th, 2013 by Matthew Rosenhaft No comments »

A great quote from a long-lost marketing guru who I would love to find again. He basically said that the business operates as you designed; whether consciously or unconsciously. Even better, the design may be from long ago of someone no longer with the company. Worse, someone you fired for their crappy design…

So, you ask what is wrong/broke with our business design today so badly that I MUST fix it now versus a nice-to-have improvement?

  • I don’t care about your solution. I expect you to solve my problem!
  • You have designed our business systems around the evangelism and delivery of solutions, not solving specific buyer problems. Perception is reality. If you have two different companies in similar industries, but different applications and custom projects; do they have the same “generic” problem? Or do they have different PERCEIVED problems?
  • If the customization to your offering, product, solution, or consulting is done “after” the understanding of the aforementioned, you are not actually solving a problem. You are evangelizing your solution and customizing the delivery. Adoption is an afterthought.
  • Adoption is the only thing buyers care about. If you define buyer adoption as “from point of pain to resolution of problem” then they are focused on only that. I don’t care about your solution, I care about solving my problem.
  • If IT projects fail to deliver on the value or derive satisfaction for buyers, why? Adoption, wrong expectations, project scope drift, lack of buy-in? How about failure to solve the underlying problem(s) because of misdiagnosis, treating symptomatic pain, missing underlying additional problems, getting agreement/buy-in to the problem the team will solve, clarity as to definition of success as solving the problem(s).

So, how does this mean our business systems are wrong?

Continue reading “Your Business Operates As Designed” »

Call to Market Leadership

May 7th, 2013 by Matthew Rosenhaft No comments »

We are looking for particular companies that are frustrated with the status quo in their market and who can partner with us to drive adoption and create a game change disruption in their market. BtoB complex technology companies are feeling the pain of the shift in buyer behavior in markets. Everyone is struggling to find an edge to get in front of more buyers, but we believe that they are not addressing the fundamental, underlying problem that will allow them to break through the adoption wall.  Everyone we speak with is seeing the 80:20 effect in their market. 80% of the buyers aren’t educated on the solution and they are only getting less than 20% of the potential buyers that they know are out there to adopt. This isn’t just about marketing or sales. This about  fundamentally redesigning the way we approach and engage with buyers. So, we are reaching out to see if you know such a
company:

  • Hit the 20% adoption wall and looking for an edge to break out
  • Clear differentiation against competitors with market opportunity
  • Good executive business leadership open to innovation
  • Complex technology solution with heavy education, customization, and strategic executive decision maker
  • Complex buying environment with variable decision makers, influencers, and ecosystems

Continue reading “Call to Market Leadership” »

Buyer Market Adoption Problem Resolution

May 7th, 2013 by Matthew Rosenhaft No comments »

The fundamental business problem that we see for complex BtoB technology companies is that they lack an understanding of the nuances and differences of how diverse and complex buyers in their markets adopt new technologies to solve problems sufficiently to enable our company to become a trusted problem diagnosis advisor and recognized solution partner in the market sufficient to differentiate us prior to a relationship and significantly transform adoption rates for your technology solution.

Peer Influenced versus Vendor Driven Shift – We see that the shift in BtoB corporate buyer behavior is significantly impacting the way buyers clarify the causation of their acute business pains, determine prioritization and make strategic business decisions, research problem solving options, define requirements, engage with vendors, and define expectations for customer experience. In short, social media has gone from a tangential impact on the buying process to becoming the underpinning of peer influence as the central foundation for decision making. This means that buyer adoption process is more influential than the traditional vendor driven solution evangelism and is radically shifting the definitions of markets. Introducing new definitions of market engagement: Continue reading “Buyer Market Adoption Problem Resolution” »

Is the 80:20 Rule A Ceiling for Your Adoption?

May 2nd, 2013 by Matthew Rosenhaft No comments »

If you define buyer market adoption as the intersection of your technology solutions adoption in the market with the buyer’s need to fix a painful problem, then your adoption rate for your technology solution is the conversion number in your available universe who actually recognize the pain to the number of buyers that you actually helped solve the underlying cause of that pain with your technology solution.

-Or-

Continue reading “Is the 80:20 Rule A Ceiling for Your Adoption?” »